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Where do poor countries get their policy ideas?

Moving on from Davos, what real hope is there for Africa in 2005? The UK's Tony Blair and Gordon Brown have had some success already bringing the issue of debt and poverty to the table of G8 countries and the EU in spite of resistance from the US, and others.

This week on openDemocracy, David Mepham from the ippr looks at the four types of damage rich countries must to stop inflicting on Africa, less their development money go to waste: conditional aid, unfair trade, arms sales, and corruption.

Economist Nadeem Ul Haque in Pakistan says Mepham's argument is limited. Development policies need to come from within Africa if they are going to work - and western aid organisation and think-tanks need to recognise the part they play in inhibiting this local thinking from blossoming.

February 16, 2005 | Permalink

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